The Imperium of Man just got Darker!

Dark Imperium is both the name of the new Warhammer 40,000 boxed set available from Games Workshop and the name of the accompanying novel from Black Library written by Guy Haley, by all accounts a prolific and entertaining wordsmith. He kindly agreed to do a short interview with us which follows below.

Dark Imperium

But onto the book!

Dark Imperium catches us up with the recent events in the Warhammer 40000 universe as Games Workshop move the story on, and push the fragile Imperium of Man that bit closer to the abyss. Whether or not you approve of the changes, Guy Haley certainly brings the entertainment. It is a good and rapid read. Starting with the climatic fight between Gulliman and Fulgrim after the Horus Heresy has ended (you know, the one that put Gulliman in stasis for, oh about 10000 years!) we then skip forward to the here and now, and Gulliman’s efforts to stabilise the situation and restore the Imperium. In using Gulliman’s viewpoint, we get to see a fresh take on the Imperium, and how far it has fallen from the high ideals of the great crusade. The loss of knowledge, the increase in superstition, and some home-truths about how the Emperor may have manipulated the primarchs and indeed humanity by not necessarily furnishing them with the whole truth. I found this fascinating, and having not read many Black Library books recently, a really good way of getting back into the universe and looking at it through new eyes. Unsurprisingly, both the new Primaris Marines and the Death Guard from the new box set feature quite heavily, and things are nicely set up for an encounter between Gulliman and Mortarion as the trilogy progresses.

Overall then, Dark Imperium is a good novel, a fresh take on Warhammer 40000 and an entertaining read that I would recommend.

As I mentioned above, Guy kindly agreed to do a short interview for us…

Hi Guy, thanks for agreeing to do this short interview. How are you today?

No problem. I am surprisingly relaxed after a frantic couple of months. The deadline fear will return soon enough, but for now I’m spending a few days catching up on my BL reading before my next project. It’s nice to have time to read!

Dark Imperium is your latest novel for the Black Library. How did it feel to be responsible for helping move the background forward in line with the latest edition of the Warhammer 40k tabletop rules?

Well, I was really, really pleased they chose me. That they’d ask me to write such an important book sort of indicated to me how much BL value my work, so that did a lot to dispel my usual authorly insecurities. I mean, I’m surrounded by stellar authors like Graham McNeill, Aaron Dembski-Bowden and Dan Abnett to name but three of my very talented colleagues. To be given a book of this magnitude of importance suggests that maybe I might be good as them one day.

Did you feel under any particular pressure when writing the book?

Absolutely. This is the single most important event in 40k since the Horus Heresy! The background is all new, some of it was still being defined as I began writing, I had to fill in a lot of gaps to flesh out the game world into a novel. Now, we do that anyway, but in this case I was tinkering with the very engines of the universe, rather than, say, coming up with cult practises for a minor chapter. To make sure I got it write I had a lot of back and forth with the Games Workshop Studio, which was great, because it is really, really important to me that what is in the game books is in the novels, and what is in the novels is in the game books. There was a collaborative feel to the process that has only grown since I finished writing it. Unusually for me, the scope and scale of the story changed while I was writing, necessitating the addition of some fairly major chunks. I usually write what I write then get the thumbs up. This time we agreed I needed to put more action into my second draft. So it was a challenging book to write, but worth it.

And of course, this kind of book attracts far more attention than some of the things I write. Pretty much everyone who has ever played 40k is going to be interested in knowing what happens in the novel, even if they don’t read it. That brings a whole new level of scrutiny. That makes me sweat a bit.

The story opens with the climactic encounter between Gulliman and Fulgrim – was it hard to write that part – so long a part of 40k lore – and them move forwards 10000 years to the “present” 40k story and pick up with Gulliman suddenly in a different era and yet still continuing the same war?

Not really. The battle at Thessala is such an iconic moment in the lore that I was dead set on writing it. In a sense, I kind of shoe horned it in, I suppose, because I wanted to write it. My excuse is that I wanted this book to link all eras of 40k together – the Heresy, the pre-Noctis Aeterna and the new now, with little hints to 40k’s deep time histories. That it is the same war is kind of the point. The Imperium thought it won the Horus Heresy, when in many, many ways it did not. The effect of that realisation on Guilliman is a major theme to the story, and I’ll be continuing that in books two and three. Did I mention it’s a trilogy? It’s a trilogy.

I know you are a gamer – have you picked up a copy of the new boxed set yet? The Death Guard models are disgustingly beautiful!

Of course! I have the boxed set and the new indexes. I played my first game last week. Good fun, though my Orks died in droves, then I lost.

I actually have a Death Guard army too. You can read about how I’m going about updating it on the Warhammer Community Website in a month or so. I love the new Primaris Marines too, I’m dithering over whether I should paint them as Novamarines or Blood Angels. Before that though, I’m working on a promethium refinery built from the new Sector Mechanicus kits. That’ll be up in a couple of weeks. Actually, I need to get on with it, so I’m cutting this answer short.

You also have released a number of books outside of the Games Workshop universes, particularly your Dreaming Cities series. How do you find the process of creating a novel differs when writing within or without such predefined constraints?

One of the reasons I can write so many books a year (last year, I worked out I wrote 650,000 words of fiction, give or take) is that I vary what I write, and how I write it. In my “own” fiction, I can make up whatever I want, and sometimes that is liberating and useful. On the other hand, writing in a shared universe with lots of restrictions makes you more creative. Sometimes that means it is easier, sometimes harder. For me, the important thing is to make sure I do a variety of projects.

A  number of the Bolthole membership harbour dreams to make it as authors. What is the best piece of advice you’ve been given that has helped you become a successful author?

 

There is no one piece of advice, I’m afraid. I always wanted to be a novelist, but I was a journalist for twelve years before I got a publishing contract. I interviewed lots of publishers, authors and agents in that time, and grilled them for tips. They all said different things. Being a journalist helped me the most. It trained me to write, and produce material of a reasonable standard to tight deadlines. However, I have also met a lot of would-be authors who aren’t and won’t be journalists. These are my top tips for you: Seek out advice from people who are involved in the industry. Don’t pester. If they help you, be nice. Do not be offended if what they say is negative (it will be to begin with), or let it go to your head if it is positive (which, once you get past a certain point, it will be). Join a writing group – I found that really useful, as there was feedback and an incentive to produce material. But above all, write. Nobody ever became a writer by not writing.

Finally, I recently became a father and I know you have a son. How do you find time to write?!

A lot of people ask me this, but in actual fact it’s no mystery: writing is my job. I work for about six hours a day usually, sometimes in the evening but mostly during working hours. My boy is nearly nine, he’s been at school for years, and is at an after school club three afternoons a week. I got my first two publishing contracts just as the last magazine I was on, Death Ray, went bust. My wife went back to work full time, I stayed at home. Even then I was working. It’s a job. We all manage to find time to earn our crust. It is significantly harder though when it is a hobby or an ambition. I remember that. You have to carve out time then, and that can be tricky.

Thanks Guy!

You can catch up on Guy’s Ork army and his terrain project over on the Warhammer Community website.

Next week we will have a review of the iconic Warhammer 40000 novel Space Marine by Ian Watson which is 24 years young but still entertaining!

Expect more reviews in the following weeks. We are also putting together a project reviewing the many Gaunt’s Ghosts novels, and I intend to update this blog with my attempts to put together a Space Marine army based around the new Primaris Marines. See the forum and the twitter feed for more, and expect some updates when I’ve got them!

If you are interested in contributing to this blog please contact Squiggle over at the Bolthole forum or on twitter.

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