Interview with Josh Reynolds

Our final interview of the month is with an author who hold one of the longest bibliographies you will ever see. With 13 novels, over a hundred short stories and even some non-fiction under his belt, not many can claim to have accomplished what Josh Reynolds has done. And that list is only going to get longer. But first, he has a few words for us.

Josh Reynolds. It's still possible to read everything he's written in this life time. But you better get started...

Josh Reynolds. It’s still possible to read everything he’s written in this life time. But you better get started…

He2etic: What is the writing process like for you? If you were to describe the process in one word, what would it be?

Josh: I treat it like a job. I set a word count goal for a particular project, I reach it, I move on to something different. Sometimes that’s research, sometimes it’s working on another project, sometimes its promotional stuff.

If I were to describe it in one word, it’d be ‘mechanical’. I get up, I write, I have some coffee, I write some more, I have some coffee, etcetera ad nauseum. It’s all very boring, unless you’re me, and then it’s awesome.

He2etic: How do you approach character development? Do you prefer to see how the character evolves as you go, or do you put more planning into it beforehand?

Josh: It depends on the character, and the type of story it is. Some characters have evolved, some I’ve had to plan. I generally err on the side of having a basic personality-type in mind, and then letting the character work out his or her own voice as the plot unspools. It’s easier than it sounds.

“When in doubt, have a man with a gun come through the door. If that doesn’t work, try a monkey with a switchblade.”

 

He2etic: You’ve written work primarily set in the Warhammer fantasy universe. In ideas as to what you’d do in the Warhammer 40,000 setting?

The Whitechapel Demon, by Josh Reynolds! Coming soon.

The Whitechapel Demon, by Josh Reynolds. Coming soon from Emby Press.

Josh: Lots. Mostly involving big dudes in power armour hitting each other or other, smaller dudes. At the moment, I’d really love to write a Space Marine Battles book, just for the experience.

Or something with a Necron as a protagonist, because why the heck not, right? I bet I could get a series out of Trazyn the Infinite just wandering around the galaxy, stealing stuff and leaving sarcastic notes. Eight, nine books easy.

He2etic: If you could cast anyone to play the roles of main characters in your work, who would you pick?

Josh: Honestly? I’d pick the person(s) who could guarantee the biggest ratings/box office draw. I want that sh*t to do well opening weekend, you know?

He2etic: Do you have any long term projects for writing? For example, do you intend to someday spin your own franchise or complete a long novel series?

Josh: Oh several. I always have a number of long term projects on the go. Franchise-wise, I’ve already got the makings of a good one in the Royal Occultist series, I think.

“Don’t argue with the editor, unless you know you’re right, and not even then, unless you absolutely have to.”

 

The Royal Occultist is the man or woman who stands between the United Kingdom and dangers of an occult, otherworldly, infernal or divine nature. Whether it’s werewolves in Wolverhampton or satyrs in Somerset, the Royal Occultist will be there to confront, cajole or conquer the menace in question.

There have been many Royal Occultists, and there will be many more, thanks to the strong British sense of tradition, bloody-minded necessity and the ridiculously short life expectancy for those who assume the post.

Knight of the Blazing Sun, by Josh Reynolds.

Knight of the Blazing Sun, by Josh Reynolds.

The current Royal Occultist, Charles St. Cyprian, is basically Bertie Wooster by way of Rudolph Valentino. His assistant, Ebe Gallowglass, is Louise Brooks by way of Emma Peel. He’s the brains, she’s the brawn. He likes to talk things out, preferably over something alcoholic, and she likes to shoot things until they die.

I suppose the stories could be called ‘urban fantasy’, or even ‘historical fantasy’, what with them taking place in the London of PG Wodehouse and Evelyn Waugh. That’d be the 1920s to you or me. The ‘Inter-War Period’ as historians call it. If that sounds interesting, you can find out more.

The first novel-length Royal Occultist adventure, The Whitechapel Demon, will be released sometime in the next two months by Emby Press and I’ve sold close to thirty short stories about St. Cyprian and Gallowglass since I wrote their first adventure, Krampusnacht, in December of 2010.

Several of these stories are available for free at the website above. There are also several audio versions of some of the stories available, which can be found here with more to come in the near future, and there’ll be graphic (i.e. comic) versions of one or two of the short stories coming some time in 2014.

He2etic: Who are your favourite characters amongst both those you’ve written, and by other authors?

Josh: Okay, lessee…

Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes, William Hope Hodgson’s Carnacki the Ghost-Finder, John Sandford’s Lucas Davenport, Caitlin Kiernan’s Dancy Flammarion, Manly Wade Wellman’s John Thunstone, Peter O’Donnell’s Modesty Blaise, Derrick Ferguson’s Dillon, Chester Himes’ Gravedigger Jones and Coffin Ed Johnson, Richard Stark’s Parker, more, lots.

I don’t believe in guilty pleasures. If you enjoy it, own up to it, unless it could get you arrested, in which case we shouldn’t be talking about it.”

 

I really dig series characters, so I’ve got a lot of favorites. More than I could comfortably list here.

As to those I’ve written? I think my top three are Mr. Brass, the American Automaton, John Bass, the Ghost-Breaker and St. Cyprian and Gallowglass, from the Royal Occultist stories. Mr. Brass is, in essence, ‘steampunk Robocop’ set in a League of Extraordinary Gentlemen world. That’s the high concept pitch.

John Bass is a darker character—a crotchety old farmer who fights ghosts and evil spirits in the Depression-Era southern United States. And Charles St. Cyprian and Ebe Gallowglass, as I mentioned above, are occult adventurers who fight monsters, magicians and madness-inducing entities in Jazz-Age England.

Neferata, by Josh Reynolds. Coming soon from the Black Library.

Neferata, by Josh Reynolds. Coming soon from the Black Library.

He2etic: Are there any books, movies, television series or even games that you think are mandatory viewing for struggling writers?

Josh: All of them? If you’re writing in a particular genre, it behooves you to read widely in said genre—old stuff, new stuff, indy stuff, popular stuff. Read all of it.

Television is good for helping you with dialogue and condensed plotting, especially sitcoms or family dramas—they’re not to everybody’s taste, but think about how little time the average sitcom has to tell a story, and how they go about doing it. That’s a lesson worth learning.

Movies are good for helping you understand how to plot longer form stories (or how NOT to, depending) and how to set mood and scene, if you’re attentive.

Basically, if you think you can learn from it, go with it.

He2etic: Is there anything you consider to be a guilty pleasure? Something that is trash, but you love reading it anyway?

Josh: I don’t believe in guilty pleasures. If you enjoy it, own up to it, unless it could get you arrested, in which case we shouldn’t be talking about it.

Also, don’t try and rationalize the problematic aspects of said pleasure in order to make yourself feel less guilty about enjoying it. That never works out. But to answer the question, I love me some sitcoms. I will devour whole DVD box sets of everything from Leave it to Beaver to Amen, the latter starring the irrepressible Sherman Hemsley and lasting five glorious seasons.

He2etic: Any advice for new authors?

Dracula Lives! by Josh Reynolds.

Dracula Lives! by Joshua Reynolds.

Josh: Write everything. Try your hand at every genre, especially ones you don’t like. Don’t argue with the editor, unless you know you’re right, and not even then, unless you absolutely have to.

Embrace formula, cliché and stock characters. They’ll make your job easier, when you start out. When in doubt, have a man with a gun come through the door. If that doesn’t work, try a monkey with a switchblade. Everybody writes something a bit crap on occasion. It happens. Move on, do better next time. Last but not least, always get paid.

A giant thanks to Mr. Reynolds for his time! Follow the Bolthole at @BLBolthole. And follow Josh Reynolds @JMReynolds.

Interview with Darius Hinks

When not strumming away at his guitar, Darius Hinks spends his time crafting novels for the Black Library. With his new book Orion: Tears of Isha about to be released, Hinks found some time to speak with us about it, and remind us that it often takes a character to craft a character.

He2etic: What is it that draws you to Warhammer over Warhammer 40k? What are your favourite things about the two universes?

Man of wonder, Darius Hinks.

Man of wonder, Darius Hinks.

Darius: Well, I live in Nottingham, so I have hands-on experience of a grimy, plague-ridden, semi-feudal society. That’s probably part of it.

The other thing that draws me in is the endless stream of lunatic heroes that spew out of GW’s design studio. The Warhammer universe is like some kind of weird cake stand, stacked with bizarre, gaudy characters. And they’re all just waiting for someone to pick them up and drop them into a novel.

I don’t really have a preference between the two settings. I look out for the characters I think no one else would tackle and see if I can fit them into a narrative. It’s just worked out that they’ve mostly been in the Warhammer setting.

He2etic: What do you think about the artwork for your novels?

Darius: The covers have all been spot on, but Sigvald in particular is just as I imagined him. If you peer closely at his expression it’s quite unnerving. He’s got such a dangerous gleam in his eye. It’s clear he’s about to do something entirely inappropriate. The artist was a chap called Cheoljoo Lee and I think he’s reet clever.

“It’s a long-held ambition of mine to write something this epic and it’s great to be on the home stretch and see all the threads coming together.”

 

He2etic: What hobbies do you enjoy? And what armies are your favourite?

Darius: I recently ‘painted’ some ogres, but I used orange and they now look like really angry fruit. My main hobbies are reading and trying to make music. I just rattled through Neil Gaiman’s latest children’s book, The Ocean at the End of the Lane, and I thought it was brilliant and terrifying. He’s great at describing parents from hell. There’s a good kitten in it too.

He2etic: What is the writing process like for you? If you were to describe the process in what word, what would it be?

Orion: Tears of Isha, by Darius Hinks

Orion: Tears of Isha, by Darius Hinks

Darius: I’ve always been annoyed by authors who whinge about writing. It’s hardly the coal face, is it? At the moment, though, I’d have to describe the process as ‘challenging’.

I’m on book three of the Orion trilogy and I’ve left myself more far loose ends than I know what to do with. It’s like the literary equivalent of Twister and if I don’t finish it soon I’m going to sprain something.  (I might ask JK Rowling to write it for me under a pseudonym.)

But it’s still great fun. It’s a long-held ambition of mine to write something this epic and it’s great to be on the home stretch and see all the threads coming together.

After Orion, I’m planning on cleansing my palette with something non-GW and then, if they’ll have me back, working on some smaller Warhammer books that require less mental wrestling.

He2etic: What kind of music do you listen to? Is it important that you listen to music while you write?

Darius: I used to listen to all sorts of music when writing, but for the Orion books it’s mainly been classical. It’s the usual suspects  – Mozart, Brahms, Beethoven etc. I tried listening to The Rite of Spring (seemed appropriate) but my cats kept rioting.

When not writing, I mainly listen to slacker indie guitar bands led by singers who can’t hold a note. I hate singers who can actually sing. Apart from Chan Marshall of Cat Power. Her voice is so perfect that I can forgive her for occasionally being in tune.

“I do find it vaguely unnerving when I read back through some of the really bloodthirsty stuff I’ve written. Some sections of Tears of Isha are so vile I had to skip over them when checking the proofs.”

 

He2etic: Can you tell us more of how the Warhammer Hero novel Sigvald came to be?

Darius: I couldn’t quite believe that no one else had snapped him up. He was such a gift. Only a few paragraphs of information existed about him, but it was all gold: a deranged, all-powerful, hedonistic, vain, funny, tragic antihero – what more could an author ask for?

He2etic: How do you write such gritty and realistic action scenes?

Darius: As I said, I live in Nottingham. Ahem… Actually, I’m not sure. I grew up reading gruesome horror novels (Clive Barker, etc) so maybe that’s it.

Warrior Priest, by Darius Hinks

Warrior Priest, by Darius Hinks

I do find it vaguely unnerving when I read back through some of the really bloodthirsty stuff I’ve written. Some sections of Tears of Isha are so vile I had to skip over them when checking the proofs. I imagine I should seek some kind of person-centred therapy, but writing is cheaper.

He2etic: Do you have any long term projects for writing? For example, do you intend to someday spin your own franchise or complete a long novel series?

Darius: As I mentioned earlier, I’m working on an idea for a non-GW book. It’s fantasy, but not in the sword and sorcery sense and it won’t go beyond the synopsis stage until the final Orion book is finished (or my editor will kick my face off).

In terms of a series, there’s 40K character I’ve had my eye on for a while. I think he would be perfect for ongoing adventures, but it will depend on whether any other authors nab him before I get to him. I’m not going to mention his name as I’m hoping no one else has noticed how cool he is.

He2etic: Can you tell us more about your work for the Black Library?

Darius: I lose track of all the stuff I’ve written for BL over the years. I wrote a batch of short stories about ten years ago. There’s one I have quite fond memories of, called Calculus Logi.

The first book I wrote was called the Witch Hunter’s Handbook and the first novel was called Warrior Priest. I’ve written a few novellas and the Orion books are my first trilogy. I think I’ve written about seven or eight books but I might be making that up.

Sigvald, by Darius Hinks

Sigvald, by Darius Hinks

He2etic: Who are your favourite characters amongst both those you’ve written, and by other authors?

Darius: My favourite characters from my own books are a husband and wife duo called Jonas and Isolde. They inhabit a section of Warrior Priest that flowed through my fingertips so easily it was more like reading a novel than writing one. It’s the piece of writing I’m most proud of.

They’re villains, really, but I’ve always had a soft spot for them. I’d like to think that they’ll still be out there, entertaining mysterious guests at the Unknown House, long after I’m dead and gone.

Actually, I’d quite like to live with them, in their strange, musical, magic-filled rooms, with all the bears, weird instruments and piles of forbidden books.

My favourite character from a real book is Charles Arrowby from a novel called The Sea, The Sea. He’s a vile, arrogant antihero, but he’s hilarious. And it’s great fun watching him change from git to slightly less gitish git.

Thanks again to Darius Hinks for the interview! Follow the @BLBolthole on Twitter for updates, articles and more. This blog’s art was crafted by Manuel Mesones, and you can check out his portfolio.

Interview with David Guymer

Today’s interview is with David Guymer, one of the newest writers to join the ranks of the Black Library author roll. Part scientist, part writer and all nerd, he’s here to answer some questions about the creative process that goes into word craft.

David Guymer, because being the lord of the rats never sounded so good.

David Guymer, because being the lord of the rats never sounded so good.

He2etic: What is the writing process like for you? If you were to describe the process in one word, what would it be?

David: Fraught.

Some people might enjoy a whispering muse at their shoulder. My writing is accompanied by buzzing neurones, lack of sleep, worry, doubt, and then I print off what I’ve done, cover it in red and do it again. And again.

It’s not a method I’d recommend but it gets the job done, and anything that can survive three or four lashings of the red pen probably deserves its place in the final draft.

He2etic: What kind of music do you listen to while you write?

David: Basic rule is not to listen anything with lyrics but the precise choice varies from project to project. I find music useful in setting the right mood for a piece and (probably for fantasy and horror more than anything) if you get the mood spot on then you can get away with a lot.

“I’m a gamer first and a writer second, but I love the fact that this is a world that enables me to do both.”

 

For Headtaker that was the Dragonball Z soundtrack with a bit of Final Fantasy: Advent Children. Big fight music for big fights! For City of the Damned I needed something more eerie. I started off juggling between The Killing and Mass Effect 3 soundtracks before ultimately settling on the soundtrack to the old computer game, Vampire the Masquerade: Bloodlines.

The Karag Durak Grudge, by David Guymer

The Karag Durak Grudge, by David Guymer

He2etic: Who are your favourite characters amongst both those you’ve written, and by other authors?

David: It’s hard not to work with a character every hour of every day and not become attached. There are actually very few characters that don’t pop into my head from time to time to demand a little love and attention. I’d originally intended to produce a small list of a selection of my favourites but, for the reasons noted above, I’ll just give you my standout, except no alternative, favourites. And that is…

Sharpwit.

The reasons are many. He’s delightfully devious, intelligent, but also vulnerable in a way that’s relatable to a human being reading about rat-men. I also think he’s quite unique amongst the skaven currently out there, surviving well into old age on the back of his wits and cunning. Before the plot for Headtaker was settled, Sharpwit existed. His full backstory and arc needed padding out, but the character was there right from the beginning. He’s my little contribution to skavendom!

As for other authors, that’s tricky too. What with their being so many. When I close my eyes and just wait for a character to spring to mind then (surprise surprise) they’re all members of the Tanith First!

Unseen, by David Guymer

Unseen, by David Guymer

I don’t know how he does it, but nobody writes characters quite like Dan. It’s doubly amazing given that his books tend to feature so many of them. The very first that came to mind were Rawne and Feygor. I couldn’t even tell you why as it’s so long since I read them, but that just goes to show how powerful they are.

He2etic: What are your favourite armies in the Warhammer and 40k universes?

David: I have a skaven army, naturally, that’s waxed and waned through the years ever since I first picked up a box of mono-posed plastic clanrats when I was twelve. We’ve fought some epic battles down the years and they’re the favourite to which I always return.

Most other armies have had my eye run over them at some point or other down the years. Wood Elves and Tomb Kings attract a lot of covetous glances. Writing Headtaker made me desperately want to collect dwarfs, but I do yearn for the chance to field some cavalry for once.

With 40K it’s more tricky. I did have a bit of Imperial Guard, but my school friends and I didn’t really play it. Necrons, Dark Eldar and Tau didn’t even exist when I last properly played 40K!

That said though, an Imperial Guard army is my current project because I do love tanks and big guns. What I *really* wanted though is Eldar or White Scars. I love them for the background and the feel of them, but neither suits the way I play. I’m a ‘sitting on my hill clustered around my war-machines’ kind of guy.

He2etic: Are there any dream characters or settings you want to write about? Not just those in the Warhammer universes, but in other franchises or even of your own make?

Curse of the Everliving, by David Guymer

Curse of the Everliving, by David Guymer

David: Ikit Claw was always my favourite character, so I’d always love to write about him. The great thing about Warhammer and 40K though is there are so many great characters, settings and possibilities that it’s a pleasure to write for any of them. I’d never fielded Queek in my skaven army, for instance.

And I didn’t think much of King Kazador in the old dwarf army book either. He was basically a dwarf lord with an extra point of strength and a hatred of greenskins.

But when you look past the stats, immerse yourself in the background, then you see that there’s so much character to them both.

If, however, we’re talking other franchises then I’d love to write a Star Trek story as I grew up as (and still am) a massive Star Trek fan.

I’ve also threatened to write a Ms. Marvel screenplay if no-one else looks likely to do it!

He2etic: What are your favourite drinks, both alcoholic and not?

David: I consume vast quantities of milk. It’s good for you, although in these doses probably less so. With alcohol, you can’t go too far wrong with a good cider. Out of regional pride, I like to get Aspall’s Suffolk Cider. So if anyone sees me dry at the Weekender, you know what to get me.

He2etic: What is it about Warhammer and its 40k brother that you love the most?

Gotrek and Felix, Lost Tales, from the Black Library

Gotrek & Felix: Lost Tales, from the Black Library

David: I’m a gamer first and a writer second, but I love the fact that this is a world that enables me to do both. When I think about what I want to write it’ll be cool stuff from the game that comes up. I want to see what happens when a doomwheel charges a giant, or when rat-ogres get shot by an Anvil of Doom.

If they let me loose on 40K, I’d want to write about a fleet battle in an asteroid belt or hundreds of battle tanks blowing the crap out of a titan.

I like that these are worlds where big things can happen, where there are heroes and villains and a whole lot struggling along in between. And I like that one will always be trying to stab/poison/blow up the other.

He2etic: If you could cast anyone to play the roles of main characters in your work, who would you pick?

David: I’d be terrible at this. I’d just want to put Star Trek and Buffy actors in everything. Will Wheaton as Felix Jaeger? No… no, I don’t think so.

“It’s hard not to work with a character every hour of every day and not become attached.”

 

He2etic: Do you have any long term projects for writing?

David: They don’t come much longer term than my ‘first’ novel, which I started working on well before I first submitted a story for Black Library. It’s a fantasy story about wizards that (stop rolling your eyes at the back) draws quite heavily from my love for Dragonball. It’s about two-thirds done. Occasionally, between projects, I’ll edit the opening paragraph for the zillionth time and then it’s back to the hard drive. I do plan to finish it one day.

It’s a long term project!

Closer to fruition, I’ve got plenty of irons in the fire with Black Library to keep me going for the near future. So I’m afraid you’ll not be seeing the back of me just yet.

That’s all the time we have for today! Thanks David!

Follow the @BLBolthole on Twitter for updates, articles and more. This blog’s art was crafted by Manuel Mesones, and you can check out his portfolio. The author can be followed @He2etic, or on his blog.

Being A Writer Is Like Being A God

Another Boltholer joins us on the blog today for some more ruminations on writing. Bod the Inquisitor aka Simon is a good friend of mine, and I’ve had the pleasure of meeting him twice at Games Day UK’11 and Black Library Live! 2012, where we spent a good amount of time talking about writing and other things. In his first guest blog for the Bloghole he presents a critical piece on a “How To Write” book, written by acclaimed SFF writer Orson Scott Card.

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Submission Tips: Canon versus Home-brew

A new year is just around the corner and for a lot of people here on the Bolthole and a few on the other Games Workshop/Black Library fan forums, that means it is going to be time to start working on a new set of submissions, whether they be novels or short stories. Of course, some people like yours truly have already started on it.

Given that, I thought I would discuss something that I know is relevant to a lot of people out there. At the outset, I would like to say that my post here is only the tip of the iceberg and that there is more to it than just the words that are going to follow but I intend this post to be a somewhat introductory one. Hope you all enjoy!

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Innovation

Hey folks, on this comfortably chilly Friday morning, we bring to you the next installment in our series of guest posts from the Bolthole forumites.This one is courtesy of He2etic, writer and video gamer extraordinaire.

Enjoy!

Innovation.

Depending on who you ask, developing an idea for a story is the easiest thing in the world (in which case, stay away from these crazy creative people) or one of the most difficult things they’ve ever done.

Ideas are one of the things that we’ll never run out of. We’ll keep having them, and keep trying to apply them. But the joy of fiction is that if an idea doesn’t work in the marketplace or reality, it can still make for a good story. Hell, how do you think many bar tales began? With a terrible, terrible idea. In fact, how many comedy shows begin with one of the main characters getting an awful idea to get rich quick or get with the ladies?

You can capitalize on almost any idea if you find the right medium. So now that we’ve had our appetizer, let’s bite into the main course. How to come up with an idea.

The human mind is a curious, interesting and above all, powerful computer. It takes in information at a speed that our current PCs can only dream of, some in formats we don’t even know how to begin to make digital. We were once taught that we have a mere five senses; sight, hearing, taste, touch and smell. In reality, we have way more than that, including the ability to guess temperatures, pain, pressure. Every moment you spend conscious, your mind is absorbing data all around you. You don’t even realize you’re doing it.

As such, this data is collected and stored in your mind. It swirls around, sometimes creating a new idea consciously. And sometimes unconsciously, as in when we dream.

The more exposure to new data, concepts and thoughts, the more ideas are likely to come of it. Nothing stems creative like exposure to new things. Books, movies, food, travel. There is no shame in being open to new things and experiencing new cultures and suggestions, provided you don’t go over any cliffs or edges here.

Not all ideas are huge or amazing. Sometimes, they are tiny things which come out of no where. For example, just yesterday I went to see The Muppets movie. And oddly enough, one scene gave me a small idea for my novel submission next year. How does a movie created primarily for kids and families give any ideas that could relate to a universe where war and genocide are the norm? Who knows. But it did.

But one thing you must be on guard against is jumping at inspiration from a new source too readily.

For example, if you finish a book and try to draw too readily from the well of ideas and story, you are at a risk of potentially plagiarizing from that source material. There is a damn good reason why authors do not read fan fiction, even if written about their own work. You probably don’t mean too, but when something becomes your obsession, you need to give yourself some time to unwind and let your mind dissect the ideas and themes. Once these ideas melt in the pot, you’re free to create something fresh and new even if the originating source of an idea is something recognizable- so long as its different enough.

The glee I take from writing however, is that this is the time that the most number of ideas hit me.

I might get my start from a dream or a random piece of inspiration that strikes, but once the words hit the page, something starts. All of a sudden new ideas are coming out of no where. Some serious brain storming starts and flashes of illumination leave marks on the story here and there. Some are huge, like bold new characters or plot twists or even entire worlds.Others are tiny details which make the world complete and interesting.

Unfortunately, it’s quite common that in the creation of a new story, we writers have a tendency to get a little proud of our work. We just sank hours, days, weeks and even months into a new piece and we may think it’s perfect just the way it is. You have to keep reminding yourself that the first thing you write is always a draft. It’s not perfect. It’s not genius. And yes, you need an editor to beat the ego out of you. Sometimes, in your rush to deliver creativity, you can actually deliver one too many ideas. Other times, an idea needs to be worked out, the details expounded upon and developed. No matter how much you love it, an idea has to get cut.

But don’t be discouraged. If you have to remove an idea, do as Van Wilder said and, “Write that down.”

In the long run, an idea is actually the least amount of work you’ll do. The writing, editing, rewriting and pushing of an idea are where the work really is. An idea comes out of no where, with no way of really knowing how much time it took to create or devise.

But we can keep track of the time spent actually trying to turn the idea into something more tangible as we craft our stories. A lot of people tend to think, erroneously I might add, that the right idea is all it takes to change the world. It’s far more than that, because an idea has to be made into something. It has to be made into reality in some shape or form. The electric heater was a great idea, but it’s not the idea alone that warms my feet.

An idea is just an idea. Get used to having ideas and having to let some of them go. Get used to saying, it’s just an idea. Because you’ll be having tons of them.

Ideas will come. So write away.

 About the Author:

He2etic is known for reading, writing and ranting on his personal blog, the Shoutbox and on Facebook. A gamer, programmer, amateur writer and generally up to no good, He2etic’s psychobabble can be found at http://he2etic.wordpress.com/ the only blog that comes with a warning from the FDA… Somehow.