Writing Market News – December 13

Due to the upcoming holidays and vacation plans, this will be my last market news post of the year. The series will resume January 3. I hope everyone has a wonderful holiday season. Do lots of reading, and writing of course.

Insert Title Here

A collection of speculative fiction stories being assembled by FableCroft Publications, Insert Title Here (yes, that’s really the name), will contain all manner of speculative fiction. The usual cautions against gore and erotica remain true for this anthology.

Deadline: February 28, 2014
Words: 2,000 – 12,000
Pay: AUD $75
Reprints: No

Penumbra eMag – Issac Asimov

The submission window has rolled over on Penumbra. Did anyone submit for the Egyptian mythology anthology? For this issue of Penumbra eMag, they are looking for stories told in the style of Issac Asimov, or that include him as a character in the story.

Deadline: February 1, 2014
Words: Under 3,500
Pay: $.05 a word
Reprints: Yes

“Astronomical Odds” Themed Anthology

Third Flatiron Publishing is collecting stories for their Spring 2014 anthology themed around “astronomical odds”. Stories should be science fiction or fantasy. Based on the theme, you’ll probably want to have a central event that is unlikely in the extreme. There’s no shortage of ideas on this one.

Deadline: January 15, 2014
Words: 1,500 – 3,000
Pay: $.03 a word ($.05 a word if chosen as the lead story)
Reprints: No

AMOK!

The beginning of a series of anthologies called “Short Sharp Shocks”, AMOK!, published by April Moon Publicationswill feature people, well, running amok. Any genre or time period for the setting is acceptable, but no slapstick humor (keep it dark). This is the non-paying market of the list today, but again, is not strictly non-paying.

Deadline: February 28, 2014
Words: 2,000 – 5,000
Pay: None (Five editors choice awards will be given out, worth $30 CAN)
Reprints: No

Writing Market News – 10/25

I was very pleased to see the positive response to the inaugural writing news post here on the Bloghole. It makes the work of putting this together seem much less daunting knowing that people are putting this information to good use. Good luck to those who already put in submissions for last week’s markets. (If anyone has a submission accepted from a market listed here, please share in the comments.)

This week we have a very diverse spread of opportunities, from speculative fiction set in the Garden of Eden to modern humor and satire.

Flytrap Magazine Issue #11

First up today is a very short notice call for a successful Kickstarter project to publish another issue of Flytrap Magazine, after the series had been on hiatus since 2008. All styles and genres are accepted, but the editor has this to say, “I like stories with sex and feminism and apocalypses and snarky humor in them, but don’t let that limit you.” Only one week left for submissions on this, so get writing if you’re interested.

Deadline: October 31, 2013
Words: Under 5000
Pay: $.05 per word

Garden of Eden

The first of a series of biblical themed anthologies from Garden Gnome Publications, Garden of Eden is seeking stories set in the Garden. The publisher doesn’t want simple re-tellings of the known story, however. They want stories of other characters who existed in the Garden, what they were doing there, and how they interacted with Adam and Eve.

Deadline: November 23, 2013
Words: 300 – 10,000
Pay: $3 for up to 1,500 words, $7 for 1,501 – 10,000 words

Fae

Fairies tend to occupy the realm of children’s stories, but Fae is looking for adult fiction centered around the tricky little creatures. Desired are stories that are true to established Fairy lore, but presented in new settings and with new twists. Sprites, pixies, gnomes, imps, and other fairy-like creatures are also acceptable. The anthology is to be published by World Weaver Press.

Deadline: November 30, 2013
Words: Under 7,500
Pay: $10

Krampus

Also from World Weaver Press, in partnership with Enchanted ConversationKrampus will feature the mythological figure that shares the name. For those of you who aren’t familiar, Krampus is the European counterpart to Saint Nicholas. Instead of rewarding well-behaved children, Krampus tortures and punishes misbehaved ones. He is traditionally depicted as a fairly standard devil. Horns, cloven hooves, all that. WWP would like to see adult stories centered around this diabolical creature.

Deadline: November 30, 2013
Words: Under 10,000
Pay: $10

OutFunny

In a bit of a deviation, today I also bring you OutFunny, a fledgling humor and satire website. The site focuses on short, quick hitting humor stories, comparable in content to Cracked or The Onion. Users then have the opportunity to append one liners to the stories, in an attempt to gain votes confirming their hilarity. The submission guidelines specify that submitted content will be prioritized toward users who have been active in trying to “outfunny” the writers by penning one liners. One caveat here is that linking with a Facebook account seems to be the only way to sign up for an OutFunny account.

Deadline: Ongoing
Words: Around 150
Pay: $25

Bonus – Angry Robot Open Door

Angry Robot Books is currently accepting novel submissions from writers without agent representation through the end of the year. Angry Robots has published several familiar authors such as Dan Abnett, Gav Thorpe, and other Black Library authors, as well as the unavoidable Chuck Wendig. Submissions should fall under science fiction, fantasy, or horror, and all sub-genres thereof. There are a slew of guidelines, so check out the submission page if you have a novel lurking in the shadows.

Deadline: December 31, 2013
Words: 75,000 – 140,000 (approximate)
Pay: Variable

Writing Market News

This will be the first of a weekly series of posts highlighting what I feel are some interesting short story writing opportunities. There are many open calls out there, but it can be hard to find and keep track of them all. Given that a disproportionate number of them seem to be for mature romance and erotica (sorry, I won’t be highlighting those categories), that makes finding the pertinent ones even more difficult.

As long as there are enough calls available to put a decent list together each week, I will be focusing on markets paying at least token rates. I think it’s important that authors get paid for their work, and I think you probably are more interested in paying markets than otherwise, so that will be the priority.

First up today, we have a pair of apocalyptic open calls.

Vignettes from the End of the World

Vignettes will be a collection of flash fiction to be published by Apokrupha, focusing on the end of the world, of course. Any form of apocalypse is acceptable, but they caution against zombies, unless done extremely well. Depending on the length of your story, this call is also paying into the upper reaches of pro-pay, so that’s not too shabby.

Deadline: November 5, 2013
Words: 500 or less
Pay: $20

Fat Zombie

The other collection of death and destruction takes an interesting look at those doing their best to survive. Fat Zombie, an anthology presented by Permuted Press, wants stories of unlikely survival. People no one would expect to make it through the end of times. Losers, geeks, freaks, handicapped, or otherwise physically or mentally incapable protagonists are the goal. An apt comparison was made to me that this sounds like the movie Zombieland. All types of apocalypse are acceptable, including zombies.

Deadline: November 30, 2013
Words: 3,000 – 10,000
Pay: $25 (not listed on website, but confirmed with the editor)

Catch me when you can… Jack the Ripper

The iconic serial killer Jack the Ripper stars in our next collection, which should well suit those from the UK. Catch me when you can is an anthology to be published by KnightWatch Press, an imprint of Fringeworks. Desired are stories in a broad spectrum of genres focusing on Jack the Ripper’s return. The idea is a new perspective on the famous serial killer, causing mayhem in a new setting, while remaining true to his defining characteristics. This is a Jack the Ripper anthology, not a general serial killer anthology, and the publisher is clear on that.

Deadline: November 30, 2013
Words: 3,000 – 6,500
Pay: 4% profit sharing
Other: Submissions must be in British English only

Far Worlds

Finally, I thought it fitting to highlight to current effort of the Bolthole publishing team, the Far Worlds anthology. There are some very interesting aspects of this collection. Stories may be of any genre, but may not be set on Earth. The intent is for stories to focus on one or more non-human races entirely. Who are they? What do they look like? How do they act? There are infinite stories to be told, but it will be a challenge to make these alien characters unique, yet still relatable to readers.

At some point in the story, a mysterious device called the Drift Engine must make an appearance. Not much is known about the device, other than it will enter and leave the area without stopping or interfering in anything going on around it. Another rule of the collection is that no faster than light travel is available in the setting.

In order to be included in this anthology, you must be a member of the Bolthole. If you aren’t already, it’s easy, so move on over here and sign up. You must must also pitch a short synopsis to the editors. Upon approval of that, you can proceed with writing the story.

Deadline (Synopsis): November 20, 2013
Deadline (Story): December 15, 2013
Words: 2,000 – 10,000
Pay: Profit sharing depending on number of authors

Interview with David Guymer

Today’s interview is with David Guymer, one of the newest writers to join the ranks of the Black Library author roll. Part scientist, part writer and all nerd, he’s here to answer some questions about the creative process that goes into word craft.

David Guymer, because being the lord of the rats never sounded so good.

David Guymer, because being the lord of the rats never sounded so good.

He2etic: What is the writing process like for you? If you were to describe the process in one word, what would it be?

David: Fraught.

Some people might enjoy a whispering muse at their shoulder. My writing is accompanied by buzzing neurones, lack of sleep, worry, doubt, and then I print off what I’ve done, cover it in red and do it again. And again.

It’s not a method I’d recommend but it gets the job done, and anything that can survive three or four lashings of the red pen probably deserves its place in the final draft.

He2etic: What kind of music do you listen to while you write?

David: Basic rule is not to listen anything with lyrics but the precise choice varies from project to project. I find music useful in setting the right mood for a piece and (probably for fantasy and horror more than anything) if you get the mood spot on then you can get away with a lot.

“I’m a gamer first and a writer second, but I love the fact that this is a world that enables me to do both.”

 

For Headtaker that was the Dragonball Z soundtrack with a bit of Final Fantasy: Advent Children. Big fight music for big fights! For City of the Damned I needed something more eerie. I started off juggling between The Killing and Mass Effect 3 soundtracks before ultimately settling on the soundtrack to the old computer game, Vampire the Masquerade: Bloodlines.

The Karag Durak Grudge, by David Guymer

The Karag Durak Grudge, by David Guymer

He2etic: Who are your favourite characters amongst both those you’ve written, and by other authors?

David: It’s hard not to work with a character every hour of every day and not become attached. There are actually very few characters that don’t pop into my head from time to time to demand a little love and attention. I’d originally intended to produce a small list of a selection of my favourites but, for the reasons noted above, I’ll just give you my standout, except no alternative, favourites. And that is…

Sharpwit.

The reasons are many. He’s delightfully devious, intelligent, but also vulnerable in a way that’s relatable to a human being reading about rat-men. I also think he’s quite unique amongst the skaven currently out there, surviving well into old age on the back of his wits and cunning. Before the plot for Headtaker was settled, Sharpwit existed. His full backstory and arc needed padding out, but the character was there right from the beginning. He’s my little contribution to skavendom!

As for other authors, that’s tricky too. What with their being so many. When I close my eyes and just wait for a character to spring to mind then (surprise surprise) they’re all members of the Tanith First!

Unseen, by David Guymer

Unseen, by David Guymer

I don’t know how he does it, but nobody writes characters quite like Dan. It’s doubly amazing given that his books tend to feature so many of them. The very first that came to mind were Rawne and Feygor. I couldn’t even tell you why as it’s so long since I read them, but that just goes to show how powerful they are.

He2etic: What are your favourite armies in the Warhammer and 40k universes?

David: I have a skaven army, naturally, that’s waxed and waned through the years ever since I first picked up a box of mono-posed plastic clanrats when I was twelve. We’ve fought some epic battles down the years and they’re the favourite to which I always return.

Most other armies have had my eye run over them at some point or other down the years. Wood Elves and Tomb Kings attract a lot of covetous glances. Writing Headtaker made me desperately want to collect dwarfs, but I do yearn for the chance to field some cavalry for once.

With 40K it’s more tricky. I did have a bit of Imperial Guard, but my school friends and I didn’t really play it. Necrons, Dark Eldar and Tau didn’t even exist when I last properly played 40K!

That said though, an Imperial Guard army is my current project because I do love tanks and big guns. What I *really* wanted though is Eldar or White Scars. I love them for the background and the feel of them, but neither suits the way I play. I’m a ‘sitting on my hill clustered around my war-machines’ kind of guy.

He2etic: Are there any dream characters or settings you want to write about? Not just those in the Warhammer universes, but in other franchises or even of your own make?

Curse of the Everliving, by David Guymer

Curse of the Everliving, by David Guymer

David: Ikit Claw was always my favourite character, so I’d always love to write about him. The great thing about Warhammer and 40K though is there are so many great characters, settings and possibilities that it’s a pleasure to write for any of them. I’d never fielded Queek in my skaven army, for instance.

And I didn’t think much of King Kazador in the old dwarf army book either. He was basically a dwarf lord with an extra point of strength and a hatred of greenskins.

But when you look past the stats, immerse yourself in the background, then you see that there’s so much character to them both.

If, however, we’re talking other franchises then I’d love to write a Star Trek story as I grew up as (and still am) a massive Star Trek fan.

I’ve also threatened to write a Ms. Marvel screenplay if no-one else looks likely to do it!

He2etic: What are your favourite drinks, both alcoholic and not?

David: I consume vast quantities of milk. It’s good for you, although in these doses probably less so. With alcohol, you can’t go too far wrong with a good cider. Out of regional pride, I like to get Aspall’s Suffolk Cider. So if anyone sees me dry at the Weekender, you know what to get me.

He2etic: What is it about Warhammer and its 40k brother that you love the most?

Gotrek and Felix, Lost Tales, from the Black Library

Gotrek & Felix: Lost Tales, from the Black Library

David: I’m a gamer first and a writer second, but I love the fact that this is a world that enables me to do both. When I think about what I want to write it’ll be cool stuff from the game that comes up. I want to see what happens when a doomwheel charges a giant, or when rat-ogres get shot by an Anvil of Doom.

If they let me loose on 40K, I’d want to write about a fleet battle in an asteroid belt or hundreds of battle tanks blowing the crap out of a titan.

I like that these are worlds where big things can happen, where there are heroes and villains and a whole lot struggling along in between. And I like that one will always be trying to stab/poison/blow up the other.

He2etic: If you could cast anyone to play the roles of main characters in your work, who would you pick?

David: I’d be terrible at this. I’d just want to put Star Trek and Buffy actors in everything. Will Wheaton as Felix Jaeger? No… no, I don’t think so.

“It’s hard not to work with a character every hour of every day and not become attached.”

 

He2etic: Do you have any long term projects for writing?

David: They don’t come much longer term than my ‘first’ novel, which I started working on well before I first submitted a story for Black Library. It’s a fantasy story about wizards that (stop rolling your eyes at the back) draws quite heavily from my love for Dragonball. It’s about two-thirds done. Occasionally, between projects, I’ll edit the opening paragraph for the zillionth time and then it’s back to the hard drive. I do plan to finish it one day.

It’s a long term project!

Closer to fruition, I’ve got plenty of irons in the fire with Black Library to keep me going for the near future. So I’m afraid you’ll not be seeing the back of me just yet.

That’s all the time we have for today! Thanks David!

Follow the @BLBolthole on Twitter for updates, articles and more. This blog’s art was crafted by Manuel Mesones, and you can check out his portfolio. The author can be followed @He2etic, or on his blog.

Author Interview – Josh Reynolds

Mondays, mondays, mondays. Always the same, yet so exciting, at least over here on the Bloghole. Just like all the mondays before, we have a new author interview for you folks, this week’s guest of honour being Josh Reynolds. Josh is one of Black Library’s most recent authors, having joined just last year and already moving on to some truly great things as you will find out in the interview below.

Josh is quite the prolific writer and works on both fiction and non-fiction, within any genre or style that he fancies. He started off for Black Library through the monthly Hammer & Bolter eZine and has a full-length novel set in the Warhammer Fantasy setting coming out in March, with another just-as-exciting-if-not-more novel coming out next year in January. In the meantime, I’m sure he will be delighting us with more great fantasy tales in the Old World.

Shadowhawk: You are one of the recent additions to the line-up of authors writing for Black Library. How did it come about?

Josh: Luck and happenstance. I was scrounging around for submission opportunities and ran across BL’s guidelines. I figured it was worth a shot, so I knocked out a novel pitch that day and submitted it. The editors liked it and the rest you know.

I sound like I’m making light of it, but to me at the time it was just one more pitch in a weekly volley.  I was surprised as anything when they got back to me.

Shadowhawk: What is the Warhammer Fantasy setting like compared to some of the other settings you have worked in? What would you say is the charm of the Old World?

Josh: That it has none? Charm, I mean. It’s a nasty, brutish place where the doomsday clock is always five seconds to midnight and the wolf is at the door of the world. That’s a pretty far cry from most other modern fantasy settings out there, which is why I like it, I suppose. Too, I’m a big fan of Karl Edward Wagner, Fritz Leiber and Michael Moorcock and their respective settings, which are all similar sort of places.

Also, it was an easier setting to set a book in for someone who has a limited and out of date knowledge of the established lore. The meta-story of Warhammer Fantasy hasn’t changed much when you compare it to how the 40k universe has evolved in the past few years. There’s less to catch up on, and frankly, I’m lazy.

Shadowhawk: You have had three short stories published through the Hammer & Bolter eZine, one of which is also in the Age of Legend anthology. What can you tell us about them?

Josh: Well, lessee…The First Duty (from H&B issue 6) is a prequel to Knight of the Blazing Sun. It features the protagonist, Hector Goetz, in his first outing as fully-fledged knight of the Order of the Blazing Sun – the repercussions of which reverberate through the novel. I was asked to write it as a lead-in to the book, and a section of it appears in the book, albeit altered a bit. Really, I was just trying to hit the beats and tropes of a good Warhammer story with it. I was testing my muscles, so to speak.

The Gods Demand (H&B issue 11 and Age of Legend) was a funny one, because it was actually completely different initially. The basic plot was the same, but the story was much less bleak. Unfortunately, about a week after I’d written it and sent it in, I ran across the Beastman army book and saw that there was a three or four page bit of text that described the fall of Hergig in detail. Not having read this previously, I, of course, wrote something completely different. So, I had to re-write The Gods Demand and in a hurry.  Other than that, I will say that I’d love to write Gorthor again…I picture him as a sort of beastman equivalent to Robert E. Howard’s Bran Mak Morn – the last true king of a degenerate and devolving people.

And finally, Dead Calm, which has a vampire pirate (vam-pirate) in it, as well as a cod-Italian necromancer and a variety of sea-beasties. Because I didn’t realize that anyone remembered Fell Cargo. Anyway, this story is tangentially tied in to Knight of the Blazing Sun. The protagonist, Erkhart Dubnitz, Knight of Manann, boisterous bruiser and Brian Blessed impersonator, is a secondary character in the book, and editor Christian Dunn liked him so much, he suggested that I write a story or two about him. So I did.

Shadowhawk: Knight of the Blazing Sun comes out in next month and is your first full novel for Black Library. What attracted you to the Knightly Orders?

Josh: Honestly, it was the fact that they hadn’t really been written about, barring the Reiksguard and the Knights of the White Wolf. I figured going for a group that (a) hadn’t been touched and (b) had miniatures available was a good bet as far as attracting an editor’s interest. Also, (c) is (or was) a playable class in the Warhammer MMORPG meaning there might be a good many folks who’d impulse buy the book, should it be published. That sounds a bit mercenary, but I like to play the strong odds when I submit a pitch.

As far as what attracted me to the Order of the Blazing Sun itself, well, mainly that they weren’t Sigmar-worshippers, oddly enough. I wanted to explore how a group acting under a more-Moderate? Pragmatic?-doctrine might approach the Long War with Chaos. Too, there’s been almost nothing written about them save the basic ‘went to the Crusades, found a goddess, brought her home’ bit, so I figured I’d be free to get creative with the Order’s quirks and ethos.

Also, I’m a fan of big ol’ crazy-ass helmets.

Shadowhawk: It was announced recently that you are working on a Time of Legends trilogy featuring Neferata, queen of the Lahmian Vampires and also the progenitor of the lords of the other bloodlines as well. How did that come about?

Josh: I was offered the gig and I took it. Beyond that, I have no idea why they decided I was the dude to tackle it. But I’m glad they did…I got student loans to pay off.

Shadowhawk: Any more Warhammer short stories planned for Hammer & Bolter this year?

Josh: One at the moment…Stromfels’ Teeth is a follow-up to “Dead Calm”, featuring Erkhart Dubnitz fighting shark-monsters and shark-cultists during a shark-holiday. Also, there are sharks.

Shadowhawk: Given the chance, which faction, character or event would you like to write about for Warhammer 40,000?

Josh: Offhand, I’d love to write something with the Celestial Lions space marine chapter…heroic, if naive, idealists who cross the wrong Inquisitor and pay for it with the very legacy of their chapter. That’s pathos that is. Box office gold.

Shadowhawk: Your body of work outside of Black Library is immense: nearly a hundred short stories, six novels and a score of non-fiction titles. How do you manage it all?

Josh: I’m a workaholic and I have excellent time-management skills. Also, I’m a relatively quick writer, which comes in handy, what with deadlines and such.

Shadowhawk: How would you introduce readers of Black Library fiction to your other work?

Josh: Well, I write a lot of different stuff so there’s bound to be something the hypothetical reader would enjoy…if you like steampunk and/or Robocop, there’s the Mr. Brass stories. If you like steampunk, but NOT Robocop, but you do like Aztecs and/or alternate histories and detectives, there’s the “Strange Affairs…” stories. If you’re a fan of occult detectives, I’ve got a slew of stories featuring Charles St. Cyprian, Royal Occultist and his snarky sidekick Ebe Gallowglass. Like Sherlock Holmes pastiches? I’ve written a few of those. Public domain pulp characters? I got you covered. Lovecraftian fiction? Done a fair bit of that too. Really, if you like genre fiction of any stripe, I’ve got something you’ll like.

In fact, if anyone reading this has their interest perked by any of the things mentioned above, they can send me a request via the Bolthole and I’ll shoot them a PDF sampler of some of those stories, free of charge.

How’s that for an introduction?

Shadowhawk: What is the writing process like for you?

Josh: It’s a bit like building a piece of machinery, honestly. It’s not a very creative process…I tend to write out an outline and then I write chunks of that outline (usually whatever bit interests me the day in question), occasionally stopping to see how it all fits together and whether I need to trim or extend anything. I work eight hours a day at the computer and then another three to four with a notepad. I also tend to work on two or three things at once, so on any given day I’ll work on a book for four hours or two thousand words, whichever comes first, and then I’ll switch over to a short story or a book review or even another book for the next four hours.

In the evenings, I’ll sit with a notepad and scratch out notes on edits I need to make or draft out scenes to write the next day or I’ll plot out the next few chapters, just to double-check that the outline is still holding its shape.

After I’m finished with a given bit of work, I’ll let it sit for a day or three, and then I’ll go back and tear it apart over the course of a day, making any changes that I think need to be made at the time. And then off it goes to wherever it’s going and I move on to the next thing.

It’s all a bit mechanical and boring, really.

Shadowhawk: Any particular music you listen to while you write or is it a case of no distractions at all?

Josh: I mostly just hit ‘play all’ and ‘shuffle’. My musical tastes are eclectic, so I get a nice random selection. I often listen to podcasts as well, or pop in a DVD. I like noise when I work. Occasionally I’ll make up a soundtrack of sorts that I listen to regularly while I’m working on a particular project…Neferata, for instance, is being written mainly to Brownbird’s new album, Salt for Salt and Murder-by-Death’s Red of Tooth and Claw.

Shadowhawk: You write both Fantasy and Science-Fiction alike. Any particular preference for either?

Josh: Nope! I writes what I wants, when I wants. I will say that, more often than not, I tend to blend the two, usually inadvertently. I use whatever tropes, clichés or genre signifiers I need to tell the particular story I’ve got in mind.

Shadowhawk: What are you looking forwards to the most for 2012 in terms of your own work?

Josh: Well, there’s the usual flock of short stories – around seven or eight at the moment – that are due to appear in print sometime this year. Then there’s the Mack Bolan novel I wrote for Gold Eagle that should be appearing later this year. What I really look forward to, I suppose, is getting more work! I’ve got a number of submissions-in-progress that I’m quite excited about, short stories and novels both.

Did I mention I’m a workaholic?

Shadowhawk: Anything else happening this year you are absolutely stoked for?

Josh: Stoked? No. Enthused? Possibly.

Shadowhawk: Any plans to attend either Black Library Live 2012 or the Black Library Weekender in November?

Josh: I plan to attend both of them, actually. I mean, I wasn’t invited or anything, but I’ll be there.

In the back.

Watching you.

Seriously though, yeah, I’ll be at both of them.

Shadowhawk: Anything else you would like to tell our readers?

Josh: Did you know that crows are great mimics? You can teach them to cuss. Just…all inadvertent, like.

Also, don’t cuss near an open window.

 ********

Hope you enjoyed that interview. You can find more on Joshua Reynolds through his blog, Hunting Monsters, where you can also find a complete list of all his work. It is a rather long list so beware!

His short story Stromfel’s Teeth, in Hammer & Bolter #17 will be out next month in January, with Knight of the Blazing Sun coming out the month after in March. The latter is also currently available for preorders through the Black Library site here.

Next we will have another new entrant to the ranks of Black Library authors, Paul S. Kemp. You may recognise his name from his numerous Forgotten Realms and Star Wars novels among other things.

Submission Tips: Canon versus Home-brew

A new year is just around the corner and for a lot of people here on the Bolthole and a few on the other Games Workshop/Black Library fan forums, that means it is going to be time to start working on a new set of submissions, whether they be novels or short stories. Of course, some people like yours truly have already started on it.

Given that, I thought I would discuss something that I know is relevant to a lot of people out there. At the outset, I would like to say that my post here is only the tip of the iceberg and that there is more to it than just the words that are going to follow but I intend this post to be a somewhat introductory one. Hope you all enjoy!

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Author Interview – Philip Athans

Monday rolls around yet again and we have another author interview to delight you all. I kept the name for this week’s author secret for a very good reason. That reason was that he is a completely new entrant to Black Library but given his already published works, he is a prominent member of the industry. As you shall all find out now.

Phil Athans is someone that the Dungeons & Dragons fans on the Bolthole should have no problem in recognizing, given all the work he did with TSR and later Wizards of the Coast. Fans of Forgotten Realms and Baldur’s Gate will recognize him from his novels. People who have been interested in, and are, might also recognize him from his how-to book co-written with the great R. A. Salvatore himself – The Guide To Writing Fantasy and Science-Fiction: 6 Steps To Writing and Publishing Your Bestseller.

Without any further ado, for the interview covers a fair amount of his work, I give to you the man himself.

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