What's Your App?

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Re: What's Your App?

Postby Xisor » Thu May 01, 2014 12:39 pm

I learnt about the difference between android and apple notifications the other week. Was cool. :)

Also, a lot of the data gatheribg/privacy stuff needs to settle down. Companies need principled limits on what can/can't be done, but similarly consumers need clarity on what they're actually under threat from. Any surrender of personal information shouldn't be an automatic 'well, you gave it away therefore anything!'
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Re: What's Your App?

Postby Athelassan » Thu May 01, 2014 3:10 pm

Vivia wrote:They're intrusive and that's why iOS always asks first if push-notifications are desired. Other than that it's a field waiting for exploitation, though I trust iOS far more than Android, Google doesn't feel overly secure (them the tax skippers and Google Play is cesspool-y. No, I don't want 200 bunny games regardless if I search for Daily Bunny or crochet books, if you offer stuff that is FB quality then I'm sorry. Free crap is still free crap).

It's not push-notifications that bother me so much (although they are annoying) as, like Xisor says, data protection. Whether true or not, I feel like signing up to (and using) an app is giving that company carte blanche to rifle through my private affairs, even if that's actually not the case at all. And I feel like, despite a lot of wordage going on from companies like Facebook about privacy importance, it's actually quite hard if not impossible to find actual information about what data is being taken, and how and by whom it's to be stored and used.

Schafer's right that this is a developing area, but I'm also pretty alarmed by some of the arguments being deployed - or even conceded by the pro-privacy lobby. Corporations have no interest - or benefit - in protecting customer privacy except as a PR exercise, so trusting them to look after it, or even really listening to anything they say on the subject, seems like a bad idea. Just because they want our information and it makes it easier for them to sell us crap doesn't mean they should get it. It doesn't help of course that such large swathes of the population are either ignorant or actively completely indifferent of the issue. The concept of privacy that took hundreds of years to create is in danger of being eradicated in a generation by stupid adolescents (adolescents being, imo, the single group you least want to have control of absolutely anything, let alone anything of any importance).


That isn't a "for no good reason". If phone users decide to stay in 2008 isn't a companies problem, they need to keep technology fresh not cater to people who stay back in the development. They go where the money is and that's for good and bad.

Yes and no. Sure, to an extent you have to move with the times, but, in accordance with the above, sometimes "the times" are being artificially accelerated. A lot of new technology is really for its own sake; it's in the tech companies' interests to oblige me to buy a new smartphone and thus make obsolete perfectly satisfactory features.

Even on a home computing level, support for WinXP ended last month, for instance but the only real reason for that is that Microsoft have new products to push and they're not getting any money from (the very large number of) XP users. (Some large companies are paying for private XP support, too, so it can clearly be done). I don't think 7 or 8, let alone Vista, is actually any better than XP, and I've never had any problems (software side) with XP that haven't recurred in later OSs; it's just enforced - rather than actual - obsolescence.

It's not just my being unnecessarily stubborn, either. The "grey market" is ever-growing, and for every silver surfer there's someone completely baffled by everything that's going on. Continuing, rapid, change for the sake of it - and making everything ever more reliant on the products of those changes - runs the risk of socially disenfranchising large sections of the population altogether.

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Re: What's Your App?

Postby Vivia » Thu May 01, 2014 11:03 pm

Silver surfers. :)

As much as I agree on some of what has been said here, this thread isn't really meant to discuss the merits of apps and smart phones, but of what kinds of apps we use and why. I know a lot of people hate smart phones, two years ago I was mostly indifferent, since then I have come to have so much benefits of my iPhone as a helping aid much better than my Nokia that it cannot be ignored. The iphone gives me a visual aid that can't be had with older phones. Apps and smart phones are highly recommended by occupational therapists here and my therapist gave me a lot of advice at my appointment this week. Yes, though it gives me a children's calender, but it's worth it. :P

Just in case, privacy:

18 Privacy betraying settings in iOS 7 on iOS Modder.

Change your privacy settings on your iPhone iOS 7.

Facecrooks is a social media watchdog I follow on FB. Only today they taught me how to turn off an app function on FB, it was lurking there deep in the settings root.

Abine.comtalks about Google's campaign of tracking us offline.

It's essential we teach ourselves about our phones I cannot stress that enough (from comments on help videos on YT some users don't know ANYTHING about basic stuff on their iPhones, it's alarming).
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Re: What's Your App?

Postby Athelassan » Fri May 02, 2014 1:37 am

Vivia wrote:As much as I agree on some of what has been said here, this thread isn't really meant to discuss the merits of apps and smart phones, but of what kinds of apps we use and why.

Yeah, sorry about the threadjack. I had been trying not to do that since you first posted it, then I responded to Schafer and things went from there (all his fault ;) )

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Re: What's Your App?

Postby Therion » Fri May 02, 2014 3:45 am

Athelassan wrote:
That isn't a "for no good reason". If phone users decide to stay in 2008 isn't a companies problem, they need to keep technology fresh not cater to people who stay back in the development. They go where the money is and that's for good and bad.

Yes and no. Sure, to an extent you have to move with the times, but, in accordance with the above, sometimes "the times" are being artificially accelerated. A lot of new technology is really for its own sake; it's in the tech companies' interests to oblige me to buy a new smartphone and thus make obsolete perfectly satisfactory features.

Even on a home computing level, support for WinXP ended last month, for instance but the only real reason for that is that Microsoft have new products to push and they're not getting any money from (the very large number of) XP users. (Some large companies are paying for private XP support, too, so it can clearly be done). I don't think 7 or 8, let alone Vista, is actually any better than XP, and I've never had any problems (software side) with XP that haven't recurred in later OSs; it's just enforced - rather than actual - obsolescence.

It's not just my being unnecessarily stubborn, either. The "grey market" is ever-growing, and for every silver surfer there's someone completely baffled by everything that's going on. Continuing, rapid, change for the sake of it - and making everything ever more reliant on the products of those changes - runs the risk of socially disenfranchising large sections of the population altogether.

Not to mention the whole trend of producing lots of short-lived technological crap. We're running out of fuel, earth is becoming more and more polluted and they still behave like there's lots of energy to waste and all that hardware production isn't going to kill us all.

Nowadays we don't need another short-lived gadget. We need solid, long-living hardware.

schaferwhat‽ wrote:Yes data and the link to the mothership is sort of bad, we all know Amazon can edit things on your kindle. I'm not sure if we as people need to move on from traditional thinking of ownership, privacy and ourselves in light of our digital existence and how we function on the computing tools we use or if the companies should back the eff away from their agenda of exploiting the digital frontier so relentlessly for money that the people who are their customers are essentially violated. Eventually one thing or the other should happen.

It's not something that will sort itself out by itself. If you buy kindle instead of a reader that doesn't allow producer to do such stuff, you're voting for the Amazon model.
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Re: What's Your App?

Postby Vivia » Fri May 02, 2014 11:29 am

Come on, read my post above. I agree with much of what you said and it's a topic worth discussing, just not here.
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Re: What's Your App?

Postby Vivia » Sat Jun 07, 2014 9:41 pm

Holy apps.


The other week I made a search for "rabbits" and found at least two useful, somewhat obscure Japanese apps.

Moon Rabbit calender: A moon calender. Kind of neat and pretty.

Rabbit Mark Diary: A diary app with a minimalistic layout. It's way more useful than one might think for short and spontaneous writing.

Evernote: It was recommended to me, though I'm not feeling the love. It's complicated even if it does the work. Too much faffing around for my taste. Free and with rather pricey subscription rates from 45 sek to 379 sek.

iLunascape: A web browser of the minimalistic kind, another Japanese based app. The support is tricky as their site is in Japanese only.

Sketches: An art app for drawing and colouring. I wanted one to use when knitting stripes. Minimalistic. Free lite version.

My Journal and Easypad: Two note taking apps, very pleasant. I tend to look for apps with yellow pages or anything that looks vintage.

It's a bit annoying that many of these apps aren't available for the iPad, Rabbit Mark Diary would be perfect there.

I think about 70% of my apps are either Japanese or Scandinavian, the aesthetics are very similar: Function and minimalism are always set in high regards, it's not surprising I always end up with those kind of apps.
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